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Horses Fly First Class on U.S. Airlines

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A prominent front-page article in yesterday's Wall Street Journal discussed the newly clarified transportation rules regarding animals on flights, and one of the first passengers to travel under them: a miniature guide-horse named Cuddles.

Cuddles assists Dan Shaw - who is legally blind - and flew with him from Boston to Chicago for an appearance on "The Oprah Winfrey Show". Ananova has a brief article about the flight, while Dan and Cuddles' website can be seen here.

Established on May 9th, the rules issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation state that "service animals" are allowed on flights, and goes on to say that "Animals assisting persons with disabilities by providing emotional support qualify as service animals". Therefore, should a mental health professional deem it necessary for you to have an animal in order to relieve "stress and flying anxiety", then that animal may come along.

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Oh Brother. I would just love to see this done with a Skunk or a Lion!

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I am the webmaster for Dan and Cuddles. The only reason for the so called accident on the flight referenced in that artical was the extremely long delays expreinced. Cuddles is well trained. I have sat in resturants and eaten with her beside us and travel all over the state with her and have not seen her have one accident.

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Monkeys and horses are fine, and yet, ferrets, mice and rats are too dangerous to ride in a pet carrier anywhere but cargo?

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