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ROAR

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 10

Your rating: None Average: 2 (4 votes)

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 9

Your rating: None Average: 2.2 (5 votes)

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 8

Your rating: None Average: 2.7 (3 votes)

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 7

Your rating: None Average: 3 (1 vote)

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 6

Your rating: None Average: 3 (1 vote)

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'Roar Vol. 4' part 5

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Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Video critque: 'Roar Vol. 4', part 4

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Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Video critque: 'Roar Vol. 4', part 3

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Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series.

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Video critique: 'Roar Vol. 4', part 2

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Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Video critique: 'Roar Vol. 4', part 1

No votes yet

Isiah offers his own thoughts and analysis on Roar as a part of a twelve-part review series

See also: Reviews of Roar 4 by Roz Gibson and Fred Patten.

Review: 'ROAR' vol. 4, edited by Buck C. Turner (by Roz Gibson)

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The theme of this particular collection is celebrity, so the stories are a bit less varied across genre than what was found in the Ursa Majors book. There are no illustrations, but there is a clever use of page decorations that are unique to each story’s subject.

With a couple of exceptions, the stories in this are furry in name only — the characters could be replaced by humans without making any changes. For some readers that’s not an issue, but for others it might be, so I thought I’d make a note of it here.

This is Flayrah's second review of Roar #4 - see also Fred Patten's review.

Review: 'ROAR' vol. 4, edited by Buck C. Turner (by Fred Patten)

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (2 votes)

Here is the fourth approximately-annual anthology of “literary” (non-erotic) anthropomorphic fiction from Bad Dog Books. There are practically no magazines of anthropomorphic fiction published today, leaving ROAR as one of the few remaining markets for anthropomorphic short stories.

This fourth volume has the theme of “fame”:

Fame—that siren song Celebrity has many stories. Perhaps it is nothing more than an incredible tale. What amazing lengths people will go to in order to find it—or escape from it. In this volume of ROAR, twelve authors explore what celebrity means and how its impact is felt. New stories from celebrated anthropomorphic authors such as Tim Susman, Mary E. Lowd, and Whyte Yoté share these pages with talented newcomers.

Editor's note: This is the first of two reviews of ROAR 4; the second, by Roz Gibson, is here.

Bad Dog Books/FurPlanet Productions, June 2012, trade paperback $19.95 (iii + 297 pages).

Review: 'ROAR vol. 3', edited by Buck C. Turner

Your rating: None Average: 4.3 (7 votes)
Roar 3 cover

ROAR is Bad Dog Books’ approximately-annual anthology of “literary” anthropomorphic fiction, as distinct from FANG, BDB’S anthology of erotic anthropomorphic fiction. With three volumes now, ROAR has established itself as one of the best publications of Furry short fiction.

This third volume has the theme of “moments” – “In a world where time flows steadily on, individual moments crystallize into the memories that define us, that we use to measure ourselves. At certain times our actions can change the course of an evening, or the rest of our lives.” Each story is about a defining moment in someone’s life.

Stories by Renee Carter Hall, Kevin Frane,
John Robey, and seven others.
Amsterdam, Bad Dog Books/Dallas, FurPlanet Productions, February 2011.
Trade paperback $19.95 (iii + 257 pages).