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Wes Anderson's next movie will feature animated animals

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Wes AndersonWes Anderson, best known to furries as the director of 2009's Fantastic Mr. Fox, will be returning to animating animals for his next movie. The movie will be about dogs; at this point, it hasn't been confirmed whether or not they are actually anthropomorphic dogs, but it's a safe assumption.

Details are scarce at the moment other than the fact the movie will be stop-motion animated, feature dogs and not be an anthology film (a project Anderson had talked about in earlier interviews, but which is not connected to the dog movie). However, actor Jeff Goldblum has unofficially revealed that he will have a role, as well as Edward Norton, Bob Balaban and Bryan Cranston. If this line-up is confirmed, Cranston would be the only actor to not previously work with Anderson. Wes Anderson has spoken about ideas for a possible future animated movie before, but stated that his ideas were, interestingly, "increasingly violent".

Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox was nominated for the 2009 Ursa Major Awards in Anthropomorphic Motion Picture, where it lost to Avatar, as well as the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, where it lost to Up. During its original theatrical release, it was a box office disappointment, making back barely half of its budget at domestic theaters. However, its reputation has grown, especially in animation circles; in Time Out New York's list of the 100 best animated movies, Fantastic Mr. Fox came in 10th overall (while Up, the movie that beat Fantastic Mr. Fox at the Oscars, was 20th), and Anderson was one of the experts polled (and, no, he didn't vote for himself). Fantastic Mr. Fox also became only the second animated movie to join the prestigious Criterion Collection.

Anderson's last movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel, became his first to be nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards, with eight additional nominations, putting it in a tie with eventual Best Picture winner Birdman: Or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) for most nominations of the year. Anderson was personally nominated for Director and Original Screenplay (he had previously been nominated in Original Screenplay for Moonrise Kingdom and The Royal Tennenbaums in addition to the nomination in Best Animated Feature for Fantastic Mr. Fox), and the movie won four Oscars (for Costume Design, Makeup and Hairstyling, Original Score and Production Design), also putting it in a tie with Birdman for most Oscars won.

In addition to directing Fantastic Mr. Fox, Anderson also voiced the part of Weasel; it remains his only credited role as a film actor.

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Unfortunately the Screen Daily link with the interview talking about a possible animated movie is subscription only; it's two years old, I just happened to remember it (because an "increasingly violent" Wes Anderson animated movie is something I'd remember) from a Newsbyte posted back when it was free to access.

So apparently the "violence to dogs" trope will continue, anyway.

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Adams' "The Plague Dogs", maybe?

Fred Patten

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That's an interesting conjecture; there is a lot of really bizarre humor in that book, it could work. And I was going to say he doesn't do adaptations ... except for his last animated movie, so that takes care of that objection. And he did pick Watership Down as one of his favorite animated movies.

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Plague Dogs was already made into an animated movie. We don't need it done again. Let's see something new for a change! Almost everything that gets released seems to be an adaptation, a reboot or a sequel. I see Moby Dick is getting the movie treatment, that's probably over 100 years old. Most of the superhero movies are characters that are decades old. I know there are some original movies but they don't seem to get the attention.

"If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind."
~John Stuart Mill~

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"Plague Dogs" was in cartoon animation. It'd be intriguing to see it in Wes Anderson's stop-motion puppet process. As for wishing for something original, wish away! I'd love to see a movie of Howard Anderson's "Albert of Adelaide" with anthro Aussie animals; Renee Carter Hall's recent African "Huntress", Michael Payne's "The Blood Jaguar", Stapledon's "Sirius" ... I could go on all night.

Don't forget that Anderson's "Fantastic Mr. Fox" was preceded by a 1998 grand opera adaptation with costumes by Gerald Scarfe and horrible music by Tobias Picker, which I think was so critically reviled that it has never been performed again. A second production can be an improvement.

How about a new movie adaptation of Wells' "The Island of Dr. Moreau", with modern CGI VFX to create convincing-looking beast-men instead of the older never-convincing men-in-makeup versions?

Fred Patten

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Well, while I think Rakuen is likely to be in luck (Fantastic Mr. Fox is still Anderson's only adaptation), I had a couple of issues with the older Plague Dogs movie, so a re-adaption would be interesting. It lacked a lot of humor of Adams' book; it could have used a lighter touch (though admittedly Anderson's sense of humor might go the other way and be too light).

Actually, if I were going to do a furry movie adaptation of Wells, I'd do a period adaptation of War of the Worlds; there were two recent comic book series with that theme (though neither were straight adaptations) which I had the unspeakable luck to be completely broke during their runs, so I never got to read them.

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Also, just kind of realized this, but if the cast is correct, that's a very American voice cast for a book that features very specific regional dialects.

So I'm thinking this is probably an original story.

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I absolutely loved Fantastic Mr. Fox, it was fresh and the characters were far more emotional & lifelike in a way that I think Tim Burton-produced stop motion features lack, and I love the fact that Anderson recorded actors in authentic acoustic settings. I'm excited for this!

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Fantastic Mr. Fox is my favorite movie of all time, and Kristofferson is a big reason I became furry so YES I am excited for this movie! Though a FMF 2 would be super awesome also xD

I'm a different furry with different opinions.

Proud Staffer of VancouFur 2017~

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No! Why can't you just have consistently lousy taste like you're supposed to!

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Like I'm supposed to? Back to the harassing are we? Bleh.

I'm a different furry with different opinions.

Proud Staffer of VancouFur 2017~

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Harassing is like ... well, I don't know what it's like but it's much friendlier harassing this time if that makes sense.

Fantastic Mr. Fox is my favorite movie, too.

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Well alright I suppose. Friendly works for me. I don't like hostility. XP

I could quote it from start to finish, and dressed as Ash for Halloween two years ago. X3

I'm a different furry with different opinions.

Proud Staffer of VancouFur 2017~

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You can't have seen the "Fantastic Mr. Fox" grand opera. Or heard it -- Gerald Scarfe's costumes and sets were actually pretty good; but Tobias Picker's awful music -- ewwww!

Fred Patten

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*chokes* I'm sorry, Grand...Opera?

I'm a different furry with different opinions.

Proud Staffer of VancouFur 2017~

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It had its grand opening at the then-new Dorothy Chandler Pavilion opera hall in downtown Los Angeles in December 1998. The furry fans in L.A. at the time all went to see it. We were sorry.

Wikipedia has an article about it that doesn’t include anything about the killer reviews that it got.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantastic_Mr._Fox_(opera)

It’s still getting bad reviews for the “improved” version in 2014.

http://bostonclassicalreview.com/2014/12/pickers-mr-fox-proves-less-than-fantast...

Fortunately, you can see highlights of the original 1998 production that show off Scarfe’s stylized costuming without too much of Picker’s music.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/opera/8328630/The-Los-Angeles-Operas-Fa...

There is actually an undated favorable review.

http://www.paulb.com/fox.htm

A Variety review of the 1998 production.

http://variety.com/1998/music/reviews/fantastic-mr-fox-2-1200456256/

My review.

http://anthrozine.com/site/lbry/yarf.reviews.u.html

Fred Patten

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Fun fact: edgelord fanboys who complain about Anderson's movies being "unrealistic" are 89.4% likely to think Christian Bale's stupid Batman voice is the apotheosis of screen acting.

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About the author

crossaffliction (Brendan Kachel)read storiescontact (login required)

a reporter and Red Fox from Hooker, Oklahoma, interested in movies, horror, stand up comedy

Formerly Wichita's only furry comic.