Creative Commons license icon


New art site, Furry Network, sees traffic growth following FA Forum incident

Your rating: None Average: 5 (2 votes)

Furry social networks have grown since the early days on the Internet. Gone are the days when you had to find some hidden Usenet group, or dive into a MUCK to hang out with furries (though you still can if you want to). Furries now have a multitude of websites in plain view, from art-based social galleries such as Fur Affinity, Inkbunny and SoFurry, to image boards and thread-based sites such as e621 and fchan.

It seems that the catalog of places for furries to flock to has become pretty saturated over the years. But even with this plethora of choices, a new contender has come out of the gates and is attempting to make its mark on the furry community. Furry Network, not to be confused with the defunct Furry News Network, is a new furry community site that is currently in beta. However, with a more-saturated market, it is important to ask: will Furry Network just be another furry site with a new coat of paint, or will it offer something its competitors don't? Let's take a look.

Update (Nov 20): A recent update has added many features. These include the support of textual and multimedia works. Therefore you can now upload stories, music, and even short movies if you wished. It also has the capacity of changing an artwork to a photo with the edit feature now. These new media types are also their own tab.

2015 Anthropomorphic Recommended List, October 15 update

Your rating: None Average: 4 (1 vote)

by Heather BrutonThe ALAA’s 2015 Anthropomorphic Recommended List has been updated from August to October 15. This includes all of the anthropomorphic works published or released during 2015 that have been submitted by someone as being worth reading, looking at, or playing. Look it over and see if you have been missing anything.

If there is any 2015 work that you feel is worth recommending that is not on here, please submit it for the next update to It is almost the end of 2015, so do not delay!

It's anthropomorphic, but do you have $91,000 to spare?

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (2 votes)

The File 770 science fiction fandom website reported on October 17 that the top-end Takashimaya Tokyo department store is selling a solid gold statuette of Baltan, a giant space lobster-man villain from the Ultraman TV series, for the yen equivalent of $91,000. A Japanese news video shows solid gold statuettes of Ultraman himself, plus other Ultraman space villains such as Bogleech.

Ultraman, a 40-foot-tall superhero from outer space, appeared on Japanese TV for 39 weekly half-hour episodes from July 17, 1966 to April 9, 1967. It was produced by Tsuburaya Productions, the company of Eiji Tsuburaya, the creator of Gojira (Godzilla) in 1954, and was meant to be for Japanese TV what Godzilla was for Japanese movies. It succeeded wildly.

A cover gallery of 'Zootopia' books

Your rating: None Average: 3.8 (4 votes)

zootopiajuniornovelization.jpgBack in August, we ran a story about upcoming tie-in books for Disney's Zootopia. Yesterday, the artwork for those books' covers were finally revealed.

The books featured are all meant primarily for children; in fact, most are meant for very young children just learning to read. But, due to the fact that they're meant primarily as children's storybooks, they feature a lot of artwork. Though interior illustrations have not been released, the covers are worth taking a look at for furries.

The Zootopia Junior Novelization would probably be of the most interest to furry fans actually looking to read something, as it would directly summarize the plot from the screenplay. However, it also features the least interesting cover; just the two leads of the movie, Judy and Nick, as they would appear in the CGI animated movie. The more interesting book covers are below.

Spoiler warning: If you're the kind of person who considers tie-in children's book covers possible spoilers, avoid reading further.

'Zootopia' gains a poster; plus, the director's furry fan art

Your rating: None Average: 4.4 (7 votes)

Yesterday, Byron Howard, co-director of Disney's upcoming furry movie Zootopia, Tweeted something was coming today. It turns out the "small treat" was the teaser poster for the movie.


Followers of Howard's Twitter account shouldn't be surprised to run into announcements about the movie, but there are other reasons to at least visit once in a while.

'Zootopia' ('Zootropolis'?) coming sooner than you think

Your rating: None Average: 5 (2 votes)

Disney's ZootopiaThe release date of Disney’s forthcoming theatrical feature Zootopia (Zootropolis in the U.K., Portugal, Turkey and other countries; Zootropola in Croatia and Zwierzogród in Poland) is March 4, 2016. But on January 19, 2016, the Disney merchandising machine will release a slew of tie-in books, published by Disney print subsidiaries or licensed by it. Most, but not all of them, will be juvenile-oriented. Some of them, such as the Disney Zootopia Ultimate Sticker Book or Judy Hopps and the Missing Jumbo-Pop, will be little more than picture books featuring the leading characters. Others, such as the Zootopia Big Golden Book, will also be picture books but will show a condensation of the movie’s plot. And a few, such as Zootopia: The Official Handbook, Zootopia Junior Novelization and DK’s Disney Zootopia: The Essential Guide, will be of interest to the adult enthusiast. No lavish The Art of Zootopia coffee-table art book has been announced yet, but there will undoubtedly be one by next March – or sooner.

Update 10/15: Cover art for most of the books discussed in this article have been revealed.

2015 Anthropomorphics Reading List: August 8 update

Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)

by Heather BrutonThe Anthropomorphics Literature and Arts Association (ALAA), which administers the annual Ursa Major Awards, has updated the 2015 Anthropomorphics Reading List to include the titles recommended by furry fans through August 8. This list is often used by fans to nominate in the next year’s Awards.

All fans are invited to recommend worthwhile anthropomorphic works in eleven categories (motion pictures, dramatic short films or broadcasts, novels, short fiction, other literary works, graphic stories, comic strips, magazines, published illustrations, websites, and games) first published during 2015, if they are not already on the list. Send in your recommendations to, and read the List to see what other fans have recommended.

Nominations for the 2015 Ursa Major Awards, in the same eleven categories, will open on 14 January 2016 (the first day of Further Confusion 2016) and will be accepted until 28 February. Don’t miss this opportunity to nominate the titles that you felt have been the best anthropomorphic movies, novels, comic strips and books, websites, games, etc. of 2015 for the Awards. And don’t forget to vote when the polls open on 15 March.

The Beast, Yeah the Beast, Yeah the Beast is Back

Stone cold sober, as a matter of fact… Another animation-influenced graphic designer we’ve discovered is Christopher Lee — no, not that one, though he probably gets that all the time. This Christopher is an artist from Northern California who later moved down south to find work in art and animation. He did, working for graphic magazines like Vapors and Buck. Lately though he’s struck off on his own, creating a line of posters, prints, t-shirts, and even toy designs based on his original art. His web site is called The Beast Is Back, and on that ominous note you should go visit if you want to find out more. Seriously, you’ll see plenty of his art on just the front page.

image c. 2015 by Christopher Lee

image c. 2015 by Christopher Lee

Those Endearing Acrylic Charms

Call her Riri. Or Riri Mon, perhaps. Either way, she’s an artist who specializes in the chibi side of things… and she’s spun that talent off into Little Heroes, a series of toony acrylic charms for the gamer fan. After a successful Kickstarter campaign they’re now available as key chains, buttons, and other wearables. Not to mention her collection of art prints (many featuring some well-known anime and anime-style characters) and 3D media. Look her up at

image c. 2015 by Riri Mon

image c. 2015 by Riri Mon

Wow! Look at the Colors!

Audrey Miller is an illustrator who works in numerous 2D and 3D media, and she’s another artist whose work often involves animals — both real ones and toony ones. A graduate of the Laguna College of Art and Design in Laguna Beach, California, she has studied both animation and illustration and since put herself to work creating prints, sculptures, plushies, and children’s book illustrations. Take a look at her web site and marvel at her way with color.

image c. 2015 by Audrey Miller

image c. 2015 by Audrey Miller

Animals With Issues… Comic Book Issues!

John Will Balsley is a cartoon artist with a distinctly “loose” style of design.  He shows off his drawing talents on his web site, where he’s created several rather-adult-leaning graphic stories with titles like The Devil’s Henchmen and Taboose the Meerka.  Many of these feature various critters who are collectively referred to as The Roofles.  Makes more sense if you look at it… or, maybe not.

image c. 2015 by JW Balsley

image c. 2015 by JW Balsley

Wood You Wear

[Un]Possible Cuts is the unlikely name chosen by two California artists (Domingo Daquioag and Philip Eggleston) who combine wood with a laser cutter to create very usual necklace charms, earrings, and even wall clocks. Interestingly, animals figure in several of their designs… They have a thing for dinosaurs and horn-rimmed glasses, it seems, if not for both at once. Check out their Etsy Store to see more of their designs for sale.

image c. 2015 [Un]Possible Cuts

image c. 2015 [Un]Possible Cuts

Watch Your Blood Sugar

More entries in the chibi parade. Michael Banks is an illustrator who specializes in full-color portraits of cute anthropomorphic animals with Really Big Eyes — in the old days, this stuff would likely have been painted on black velvet. You can probably guess what he had in mind when he named his company Sugar Fueled. He sells individual prints, but he’s also put together several collections of his artwork that are available at his official web site.

image c. 2015 by Michael Banks

image c. 2015 by Michael Banks

Tooting Panda Toons

The cartoonist known as Linda Panda has a thing for, yes, pandas. Pandas who… fart. Friendly farts that smile and make comments. Seriously. This is the odd world of Linda’s panda cartoons, and she’s been creating them daily and putting them up on the web for some time now. More recently, thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign, she’s collected hundreds of her daily works (as well as her more “traditional” sketches, perhaps) in book form. Head over to her official web site to find out how to get your own copy — as well as buttons and prints and other such ways you can see farting pandas.

image c. 2015 by Linda Panda

image c. 2015 by Linda Panda

What Up, Dogs?

Richie Wu is an artist who spent six years working in the gaming industry, as well as teaching illustration on the side. He’s worked on feature films like Toy Story 3 from Disney/Pixar, and TV series like Ben 10 Alienforce from Cartoon Network. Now he’s aiming his artistic talents at a new outlet: A line of illustrated t-shirts based on his original canine comic creations. Dogs like Garlic the chihuahua, Booze the bulldog, and Mocha the German shepherd, among several others. Visit his web site, Bad to the Bone, to see the latest in his growing set of designs. Currently residing in Las Vegas, Nevada, Mr. Wu also has a permanent display selling his t-shirts at the Galleria at Sunset Mall in nearby Henderson.

image c. 2015 by Richie Wu

image c. 2015 by Richie Wu