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fursuits

Fursuits and the costumers who wear them. Check out the Fursuit Wiki for more feeds.

Stealth vs blatant and the "Mouse Problem"; furry coverage in fictional media

Your rating: None Average: 4.7 (6 votes)

As repeated media victims we furs are always on the lookout for furry references— good, bad or indifferent— on TV and elsewhere. There are two distinct styles in which our fandom is covered: bluntly by name, and more subtly. It’s easy to identify the former, but sometimes it’s more fun when they don’t use the 'F-word' to describe the group in which they are referencing in their content. In those instances, it seems more a stealthy shout-out for our animal-ears only, designed to fly over the head of anyone who doesn’t get it.

Today I wish to go over some of those moments in furry media that seem to hold general fandom idioms and how fun 'situational nuance' can be.
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Violent J's furry daughter calls out snaky fursuit sellers OISK

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (8 votes)

A video released last weekend caught viral attention both inside and outside the furry fandom. In gthis presentation, a member of a rap group known as the Insane Clown Posse talked with his daughter about being swindled by an online marketplace selling inferior fursuit knockoffs.

Violent J of the ICP and his daughter, introduced as Ruby, discussed their personal experience with an online retailer of OISK, a seller on the website DHGate. The family-friendly breakdown goes over how the final product differed greatly from what was advertised on the site.

The well-produced skit is a good conversation starter, particularly when it comes to the topic of these organizations that would take advantage of the dreams of future fursuiters by siphoning money in return for low-quality costumes.

Furs: $13,500 for a fursuit is too expensive! Gamers: Hold my beer!

Your rating: None Average: 4.1 (10 votes)

This week, the furry world was rattled by news from the fandom’s bidding site of Dealer’s Den when a record setting bid closed out a battle to acquire a fursuit from the highly in demand Made Fur You. The final bid came in at $13,500 dollars by Desafinado, a fursuit collector who already has two to their name made by Mischief Makers, dropped the wad of cash to secure their third. They plan on making a horned cat character named Sage with it. They have done an interview over the transaction with Dog Patch Press that can be found here.

The transaction has brought up many critical statements. In those they note that the amount of money is the amount of a car, or a sizable down payment on a mortgage. Of course, such comparisons to practical commodities overlook the fact that the purchaser in question may already have shelter and a mode of transportation that they are secure and happy with. Finances are a very personal thing, and it takes some perspective to realize that there is always someone out there who will make a less practical financial decisions in the world when they are secure in the needs department. In fact many furry artists bank on this.

Are furries trying to poison your kids with detergent pods?

Your rating: None Average: 2.9 (29 votes)

Update (12 Jan): YouTube removed the Tide Pod Pizza video. Here's a copy in China.

Well, if you're familiar with the concept of Betteridge's Law, then you should already know the answer to that question. Hint: it's no. However, it's certainly an odd question to even present without a reason. So why ask?

Pousta, a Spanish language news site that covers fashion, design, music, and trends, posted an article about an early “fashion” of 2018 (Spanish). It covers a recent Internet meme around the consumption of detergent pods, and particularly its growth because of a video. This video is one of a furry YouTuber named Majira Strawberry with fellow fursuiter Arrin. The video ends with Arrin cooking a cheese pizza decorated with detergent pods.

R.C. Fox charged with criminal possession of child pornography

Your rating: None Average: 4.3 (3 votes)

Police!.pngNews out of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania from September announced that one Carl R. Rickwood was charged with 20 counts of dissemination of child pornography. It has recently been revealed that this perpetrator was actually a furry by the fandom name of R.C. Fox. A full breakdown of the documentation can be found on a video by Ragehound.

R.C has been a prolific member of the fandom, having his own fursuit since 2014, and also attending and volunteering for multiple conventions. They were also slated to run a disc jockey session at the upcoming Furpocalypse until this news was brought to staff's attention and they indicated they would not be in attendance. They were also featured in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette piece 'Meet the Furries'.

Since the news emerged, R.C.'s social media accounts on Twitter, Fur Affinity, and even YouTube have been removed, renamed, or disabled. As of now no arrest can be confirmed.

Do you consider yourself someone who values fursuits/fursuiting more than any other medium in the fandom?

Yes
12% (19 votes)
No
88% (138 votes)
Votes: 157

The 2016 Ursa Major Award winners

Your rating: None Average: 3.3 (4 votes)

The 2016 Ursa Majors Awards logo.The 2016 Ursa Major Awards have been announced on Friday afternoon, June 30th at the Anthrocon convention in Pittsburgh. The Ursa Major Awards, for the best anthropomorphic fiction of the past calendar year, are presented in twelve categories by the Anthropomorphic Literature and Arts Association (ALAA), and are voted upon by the public on the Ursa Major Awards website.

Video: 'Into the Bayou'

Your rating: None Average: 3.3 (12 votes)

Razzmic Productions presents Into the Bayou.

Roquin the fox has lost all his passion and desire. He discovers an entry about an exotic and nearly extinct plant in an old botany textbook. He travels to the furthest swamps to find this mysterious plant overcoming various obstacles along the way in this 3 minute video.

This video was created for the Furry Drama Show at Texas Furry Fiesta 2016 convention which had the theme of "Bayou", unfortunately, they ran out of time and weren't able to show it. So it is being presented here for your enjoyment.

Opinion: 'Fursonas' is the film we need

Your rating: None Average: 3.6 (14 votes)

Fursonas If any of you readers are like me, then you only follow Flayrah when it comes to furry news. I saw an article shared around a year ago about furry music, and that's how I found this site.

But amidst the posts about cons being cancelled and the abundance of Zootopia reviews came a shining light no one saw coming. Mostly because even on a site about the very subject it is meant to educate on, it got no attention.

This film is Fursonas, a documentary about the furry lifestyle. A detailed look at the friendly fandom that CSI ruined public perception of all those years ago, such that we still feel repercussions today. It wasn't until my best bud crossaffliction mentioned this movie in, of course, a Zootopia-related post that I became aware of it. I started to dig, and realized what a gem we'd been missing.

Dogpatch Press (who I've now since started to follow alongside Flayrah) posted an incredible article on this film, which I suggest all members read, as this post is just to drum up hype for this film. One line from that article holds substantial water for me; Zootopia is the film we want, but Fursonas is the film we need.

EZ Wolf releases fursuit advert "Stay as You Are"

Your rating: None Average: 3.7 (3 votes)

An advert for EZ Cooldown cooling vests for suiting peformers was released by EZ Wolf. The scolling shot features many fursuiters performing a wide variety of wacky tasks slowed down dramatically while the accompanying music by Fox Amoore and Pepper Coyote of Look Left encourages the audience to "Stay as You Are".

EZ Wolf is well known for his works in furry cinemtography, including the "infamous" Room 366 video which caused controversy in the fandom when it was leaked back in 2011. If you look hard enough, you may find an Easter egg referencing that particular video towards the end.

1,000 marching Pikachus

Your rating: None Average: 4 (5 votes)

This news is a year old, but I don’t recall seeing any mention of it on any furry newssite from then until now..

There was a Pikachu Tairyou Hassei Chu (“An Outbreak of Pikachus”) Pokémon convention in Yokohama on August 9-17, 2014 that included a march of 1,000 costumed Pikachus (according to original press releases; it appears considerably less Pikachus actually marched) through the city.

Many people took videos of the marching Pikachus, added music including heavy metal tracks, John Williams’ Star Wars Imperial march and old Imperial Japanese Army military marches, then posted them to YouTube.

Anthrocon: Furry convention becomes staple of steel city

Your rating: None Average: 4 (4 votes)

When Anthrocon started in Albany in 1997, the humble gathering went by the name of “Albany Anthrocon”. Two years later the convention found itself moving out of New York State and into Pennsylvania. Through that was learned the first major mistake a fledgling convention could make. Naming your new convention after the city it is hosted in is like someone getting their lover’s name tattooed to their arm. Ironically, it’s a mistake that other conventions still make to this day.
 
But living through mistakes is what makes one stronger in the end. It has now been about one decade since the largest furry convention had made its home in Pittsburgh. At this point I think it’s a much safer bet to commit to being inked.
 
As there were 6,389 recorded attendees to this convention, there are just as many stories and perspectives on the convention. So this review will focus on three sections I focused my experiences around: fursuiting, performances, and writing. It is essential to note that reviewing a convention is unlike reviewing any other medium where you can experience a full package. Many panels run concurrently so one has to make a choice, usually based upon one’s preferences.
 

All about fursuits

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (6 votes)

Copyright RackedRacked, an online fashion magazine, has just published a particularly good illustrated article on fursuits; their history, the people who make them, and the furry fans who wear them.

It's the freakin’ weekend. A blessing of rainbow unicorns dance around you. Your heart bursts with joy at the sight of a dairy cow and an otter gingerly embracing. Sweat drips down your face. You remove your head and wipe the sparkling droplets away with the back of your cerulean paw. A rabbit wearing paisley suspenders invites you to hop with him in a circle. You radiate happiness inside and out. You are not dead. You are not on acid. You are at a furry convention.

Each year, dignified professionals from every major industry cast off their business casual, zip up their fursuits, and flock to furry events around the world. According to Furry Hall of Fame inductee and historian, Fred Patten, 74, the term "fursuit" was originally coined in 1993 by former Midwest Furfest chairman Robert C. King to describe full-body anthropomorphic animal costumes worn to conventions.

BBC's 'Why Factor' talks anthro animals with Cambridge furs

Your rating: None Average: 4.8 (6 votes)

BBC World Service Why Factor: Animals Are Us Journalist Maria Margaronis interviewed furry fans at a Cambridge Furs meet last month for next week's episode of The Why Factor, a programme exploring "the extraordinary and hidden histories behind everyday objects and actions" through the voices of those involved.

In stories, cartoons, advertisements and our everyday lives, we project human thoughts and emotions onto animals—and claim their strength and style for ourselves in the brand names of cars and cosmetics. Why do we do that, and what do we get out of it? Can we ever know what animals really feel? And are we as different from other species as we like to imagine? Maria Margaronis meets the furry fandom, who put on “fursonas” and cartoonlike animal costumes to meet and socialise. Neuroscientist Bella Williams upends some assumptions about animal brains and explains how to read a mouse’s facial expression; children’s author Michael Rosen sportcasts an insect race. Farmer Helen Reeve reflects on how she feels about eating her own cows. And historian Harriet Ritvo poses a thornier question: what makes our species think we are secure in our dominance over the natural world?

The 18-minute show "Animals Are Us?", which received input from furry artists, fursuiters, fursuit-builders and other fans, is to be broadcast on the BBC World Service on Friday 24 at 18:32 and 23:32 GMT (EDT+4, BST-1), with re-broadcasts on Sunday (21:32) and Monday (04:32, 12:32).

Update (23 April): A four-minute clip featuring several furs is available (transcript below).

Update 2 (24 April): The full episode has been published. There is no additional content featuring furries, but you may find the rest interesting, as it's all about anthropomorphism.

Furry DJ NeonBunny's "Eat, Sleep, Fursuit, Repeat"

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (2 votes)

DJ NeonBunny has entered the world of music production with a song called "Eat, Sleep, Fursuit, Repeat". Inspired by deep house hit "Eat, Sleep, Rave, Repeat" [video] by Fatboy Slim and Riva Starr, NeonBunny set out to create an original track about fursuiting. As the founder and resident DJ of Frolic in San Francisco, he wanted to write a song about his favorite scene, and for the fursuiters who love to frequent the dance floor.