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Inkbunny

Inkbunny is a feature-rich furry art site launched in 2010, which grew after Fur Affinity banned cub porn, but has since suffered from the stigma of that audience. Despite this, Inkbunny has grown to host over half a million submissions, and, as of mid-2014, receives more visitor traffic than SoFurry or Weasyl.

Which furry art/story community improved the most over 2014?

Fur Affinity
18% (17 votes)
Inkbunny
24% (22 votes)
SoFurry
16% (15 votes)
VCL
4% (4 votes)
Weasyl
37% (34 votes)
Votes: 92

Furry websites face broad denial-of-service attacks

Your rating: None Average: 4.6 (18 votes)

Fur Affinity connection timeout Online furry communities are reeling after a series of distributed denial-of-service attacks now entering their second day, which not only knocked out Fur Affinity, but have impacted a variety of less-well-visited art and chat sites.

Fur Affinity has been practically unavailable since the disruption started, at 10PM EDT on Tuesday. Its forums, which initially remained up, went offline Wednesday afternoon.

SoFurry was the next-worst hit, with almost complete downtime since their attack started, also late on Wednesday, while Inkbunny, Weasyl, e621 and F-list have all suffered attacks.

Reactions to the attacks have been mixed, with Weasyl upgrading servers, while Inkbunny advised users to "take the opportunity to spend time with the important people in your life".

Fans fret as Fur Affinity nears fifth day of read-only mode

Your rating: None Average: 4.5 (6 votes)

Nearly five days have passed since Fur Affinity entered read-only mode, and despite ongoing staff efforts, the interruption has led many users to mull alternatives.

The unheralded change, initiated in an attempt to resolve slowdowns during peak hours, caused consternation among artists, many of whom rely on the site for their income:

The problem is, this was unplanned downtime. […] If it was planned […] people would have had time to get things together. Such as commissioners, contests, bids, etc. and where to get in contact or if the bids/auctions are postponed while the site is down.

[…] at first I was worried that I wouldn't be able to make any money for christmas, but now I'm starting to worry that FA will be down so long that I won't be able to make enough for rent. […] it's so very disheartening when it was supposed to be a nice holiday season...

Operations team lead yak began an attempt to clear backlogged database transactions on Monday afternoon "as fast as the RAID10 array of 15k drives allow". A day later, FA status forum poster Raptros reported that the database would be transferred to a different server.

Staff then reported "waiting on two new hard drives to come in" to replace failed hardware, which they did on Friday afternoon. Advertisers were given ten extra days in compensation.

Update (15 Dec): An announcement posted on Sunday morning:

The last of the data is importing, and we'll be standing by to finish the upgrades. ETA should be tonight.

Update 2 (16 Dec): Oversized notification tables were cited by FA coder net-cat as both the source of delays and a reason for the slowdowns:

[The current method of notification handling] is not scalable and quickly becomes unsustainable for sites with 10^5 and 10^6 users.

Staff have rewritten queries, tweaked database settings, and intend to prune notifications older than 90 days soon after the site returns.

Update 3 (17 Dec): Fur Affinity came online for a few minutes before stalling and returning to read-only mode, "unable to handle a flood of users while rebuilding the RAID arrays". The site returned eight hours later, with mass notification clearing options disabled.

Users flooded social networks to complain about the disruption and compare alternate sites; primarily Inkbunny, SoFurry and Weasyl. On FA's forums, a 20-page thread was locked after discussion degenerated; it was soon replaced, while fans clamoured for software upgrades.

August 2013 Newsbytes archive

Your rating: None Average: 3 (1 vote)

Contributors this month include crossaffliction, dronon, Fred, GreenReaper, Higgs Raccoon, mailboxbooks, Patch Packrat, Rakuen Growlithe, RingtailedFox and Sonious.

How to switch art sites without losing customers

Your rating: None Average: 4.4 (5 votes)

As someone who has been in a community of artists, I hear a common conundrum arise:

I really want to leave this art site, but it’s too popular and leaving would mean losing out on a valuable resource to gain/keep customers.

This article presents ways you can use your control over your own works to influence your customers to view them where you wish them to, while also maintaining a presence so that others may find you.

This is written as a neutral piece and the methods can be used on any free art posting site. To that end, we'll call the site you wish to vacate “BadVibeArt”, and the place you want to go “NewBeginningDoodles”. Both are general-use sites for stories and art alike, comparable to sites such as deviantART, Fur Affinity, Inkbunny, SoFurry or Weasyl.

Inkbunny starts v2.0, T-shirt contest to celebrate 3rd year

Your rating: None Average: 5 (3 votes)

Lunicent's Inkbunny t-shirt contest entryInkbunny is celebrating three years online by announcing a major redevelopment project – and a T-shirt contest.

We want to move to an open source model to get the community involved in extending the capabilities of the site, and so that anyone can easily create their own art/social site.

To do this we are creating the new site engine from the ground up. It will have all the features that people like from Inkbunny v1.0, but will use an established web framework, will have a new and improved interface and will launch with a bunch of new features we've always wanted to see added to the site.

The site, which saw its 300,000th submission this week, was launched in June 2010 after three months of closed testing. Since then, Inkbunny has added various features, including user-suggested keywords, but development has come in bursts due to time constraints.

Irish survey seeks to discover 'who are the furries?'

Your rating: None Average: 4 (2 votes)

A new ten-minute survey has been released, aimed at furry fans 18 and older.

The survey, which contains "items on personality, personal life, and basic demographics", was created to support research at University College Cork in Ireland, and is intended to "gather data on the kinds of people that make up the furry community":

The use of the internet to support a shared interest and activity is very interesting to me, and I also am curious about the more sexual side to the fandom.

My study will attempt to determine two things - 1) Who are the furries? (assessed by simple demographics) and 2) What is the place of the Furry fandom in the context of the existing literature on internet behaviours?

It was initially distributed on Inkbunny, where a researcher has been answering questions.

Compare: Latest survey results from the separate Anthropomorphic Research Project.

Inkbunny deploys community keyword suggestion system

Your rating: None Average: 5 (2 votes)

Furry art community Inkbunny has deployed a means for users to suggest and approve keywords. The long-anticipated feature was rolled out after several days of testing, leading to the addition of keyword history.

The feature had been requested by users wishing to improve the site experience for others, as keywords are used heavily by Inkbunny's search and blocking features:

While Inkbunny remains one of the most comprehensively tagged/keyworded archives among all the furry art sites, we believe this new feature will make immense improvements both to finding submissions by keywords you want to see, and blocking submissions with keywords you want to avoid.

Inkbunny upgrades submission size, search; adds suggestions

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (2 votes)
Inkbunny

Furry art community Inkbunny has announced several upgrades, including increased max. submission size (30Mb; 6000x6000), greater control over notices, improved keyword suggestion, and the ability to search by content rating, time range or user.

The update is the first since September 2011 – though some changes had been made earlier, but not announced.

User feedback has been generally positive so far, although the new "suggested submissions" feature (which highlights work favourited by watched users) received a mixed response.

Inkbunny hosts over 180,000 submissions and has 96,000 members; ~10,000 are active in any one day. It was recently nominated as Best Website for the 2011 Ursa Major Awards.

The author is an Inkbunny moderator.

What's your preferred online art community?

deviantART
16% (20 votes)
Fur Affinity
37% (46 votes)
Inkbunny
17% (21 votes)
Nabyn
2% (2 votes)
Pixiv
5% (6 votes)
SoFurry
13% (17 votes)
Another (comment)
2% (2 votes)
Don't use any
10% (12 votes)
Votes: 126

A survey of furry story sites

Your rating: None Average: 4.3 (16 votes)

Way back in May 2006, I wrote a little piece called “The State of the Furry Zine.”
This is a somewhat informal update to that survey.

No matter what kind of work you create, thought needs to go into where you’ll publish it. Writers have more to consider; each site handles text differently. Print publications still carry a different weight for writing, as do e-books; there’s a quantifiable difference between having your story read as a Fur Affinity post versus on a Kindle. But has the web won?

Analysis: Fur Affinity's staff revamped; dev team still lacking

Your rating: None Average: 3.7 (10 votes)

Fur Affinity recently announced a restructuring and increase in staffing. On the main site, staff acknowledged "administrator inaction, bias, and a lack of accountability" but assured users that they "truly want to fix the issues, and [are] working toward a better Fur Affinity."

To see whether this change is going to be enough to improve Fur Affinity, I want to compare the administration structures of the three main furry art sites – Fur Affinity (FA), SoFurry (SF) and Inkbunny (IB) – plus a few details from commercial alternative deviantART (DA).

Site Users Staff^ Views/Month (est.)$ Views/Month/Staff
Fur Affinity* 516?225 30 6?958?710 231?957
SoFurry** 167?591 27 [19] 974?580 36?095 [51?294]
InkBunny# 55?660 7§ [6] 227?490 32?498 [37?915]
deviantART## >16?000?000 92 250?000?890 2?717?400

Inkbunny reconsiders 'no humans, no photos' policy

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Humains interdits, by RacineFurry art and story gallery Inkbunny has changed their content policy to permit limited photography and human-based art.

Humans and human-style characters are now allowed in art as long as they are not engaged in sexual activity and don't show genitals or sexual arousal. Stories containing humans were already permitted along similar lines.

Photographs of objects created "by you or for you" or acting as a background to another work may also be uploaded.

Launched in June, Inkbunny's features and policies won fans among those looking for a venue to sell their work, but many who draw humans or human-like characters avoided the site. Sculptors, photographers and fursuit builders also had little to contribute until now.

Inkbunny breaks even on hosting, while ArtSpots revamps

Your rating: None Average: 4.3 (3 votes)

Furry art gallery Inkbunny says it is covering hosting costs from sales after three months of operation. The maximum file size of free works has also doubled to 20Mb. The site, launched in June, sells artists' prints and downloads for a 20% cut, and hosts over 15,000 works.

Meanwhile, all-ages art site ArtSpots has undergone a complete redesign – much to the surprise of users. While many praised the new layout, not all like the "blog-like" artist homepages, and some feel the new site lacks useful features like sketch chat.

The changes come not long after Fur Affinity updated its own menu style. The new design provides slightly cleaner visuals and more horizontal space, but also more prominent ads.

Inkbunny art community launches; offers prints, downloads

Your rating: None Average: 3.5 (4 votes)
Inkbunny

A new furry art and story community has launched, offering artists a way to sell digital downloads and prints.

The site – Inkbunny – permits non-human artwork of all ratings; however, only adults 18 or over may join.

Site founder Starling outlined the sales philosophy:

At Inkbunny we believe two revolutionary things about selling art; that people want to buy your work even if they can get it for free, and that you should not worry too much about piracy of your work.

Development took over a year, with nearly 800 works uploaded in a four-month private beta.