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Animation: 'Pups of Liberty'

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Pups of Liberty: The Boston Tea-Bone Party, an educational animated short film by Bert and Jennifer Klein’s Picnic Pictures – available on DVD from Amazon.com for $15 (or from izzit.org); 18 minutes -- about the outbreak of the American Revolution, featuring dogs as the American colonists and cats as the British oppressors, has been referenced on the Internet since 2009; but I do not believe that it has been reported on Flayrah.

This new Cartoon Brew post reveals that it was made by moonlighting Disney animators, including many top names.

Of more anthropomorphic interest, however, is the commentary on this article, arguing whether it is “natural” to portray cats oppressing dogs. Why not dogs oppressing cats? Or cats oppressing mice? Or mice oppressing cats? Or any animals oppressing any other animals, because this is a humanocentric concept that animals do not really share?

Do any Furry fans have any comments on this? The Cartoon Brew’s website is open.

Comments

Your rating: None Average: 4 (1 vote)

Clearly it is simply bias on the creature's part, clearly they are a dog person and not a cat person. Therefore the dog is protagonist and cats are antagonist.

Your rating: None Average: 3 (1 vote)

Such speciesism!

Your rating: None Average: 2 (1 vote)

I wish the British were fish.

Your rating: None

It sounds interesting. I'd be pro-cat. :p

I'd rather not speculate on whether there was any reason the species were chosen other than that they are stereotypically in conflict. An even better question would be how the British and Americans, who came from many countries in Europe including Britain, suddenly became different species.

"If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind."
~John Stuart Mill~

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About the author

Fred (Fred Patten)read storiescontact (login required)

a retired former librarian from North Hollywood, California, interested in general anthropomorphics