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Symbol of a Nation slated for Anthrocon release

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Front cover of the book Symbol of a Nation, art by Jenn 'Pac' Rodriguez Symbol of a Nation, edited by Fred Patten, is launching at Anthrocon 2017 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania over the June 29-July 3 five-day weekend.

Symbol of a Nation is an all-original anthology of 11 short stories and novelettes featuring the anthropomorphized official animal (or bird) symbols of nations. This is designed to appeal to both s-f & fantasy fans, and fans of political science.

Below are the list of countries and animals that will be included in this set:

Belgium – lion
Chile – Andean condor
Denmark – mute swan
Italy – wolf
Malaysia – tiger
Mauritius – dodo (extinct)
Namibia - oryx
Romania - lynx
Singapore - lion
Spain - bull
U.S.A. – bald eagle
Vietnam – water buffalo

From a famous extinct animal bioengineered to new life, to animal/bird astronauts, to animals adapted to their nation’s environments, to a 19-century heraldic animal struggling to remain relevant in today’s world, these are stories that will make you think about the national animal symbols that we and some of our neighbors have adopted.

Contents

♣ Didus ineptus Linnaeus, by Roz Gibson
♣ A Poor Uncle’s Apprentice, by BanWynn Oakshadow
♣ Remembering the Forgotten, by H. J. Pang
♣ The Moon Like an Unhatched Egg, by Mary E. Lowd
♣ Crossroads the Namib, by Jako Malan
♣ Sdani White Wings, by Jennifer Sowle
♣ The Scent of Lantana, by Frances Pauli
♣ Huitaca, by Televassi
♣ To the Kingdom They Come, by H. J. Pang
♣ Bread and Butter, by Allison Thai
♣ The Lion of the Low Countries, by Alice “Huskyteer” Dryden

The book is available for pre-ordered now from Goal Publications. It will be for sale at the Goal booth at Anthrocon. After the convention it will be available for online purchase on Goal's catalogue after the convention. Price:  $17.50.  vii + 241 pages.  Print ISBN 978-0-99791-253-1, Digital ISBN 978-0-99791-254-8. Wraparound cover by Jenn ‘Pac’ Rodriguez.

The digital copy will also be made available sometime after the convention.

Comments

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That pictures kind of blurry, I thought it said "An anthrology." Also this one has a story by one of the South African furs.

"If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind."
~John Stuart Mill~

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If you click on the thumbnail, you'll see a higher-quality version of the cover art. The thumbnail I originally uploaded for this article wasn't meant to be shown at the current resolution; it's been enlarged and stretched for some reason.

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Mmm. So, the guidelines are that thumbnails should be at least 280px wide and 150px high where possible, because only then will it be shown on Twitter as a full accompanying image - as well as simply showing more to casual viewers.

However, if an existing thumbnail is too small, it should be regenerated from the source image - resizing down is OK, within reason, either in the browser or an image editor, but not up. And the aspect ratio of width vs. height should normally be kept constant, because otherwise it results in deformation.

I've been away from my main computer for a bit and not around with editors to chat about such things, so sorry about that.

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Cubist edited three ANTHROlogies, published by Anthro Press. They aren’t in print any more.

Long, Quentin, ed. ANTHROlogy One. Anthro Press, November 2008, 602 p.
An anthology of fiction, poetry, essays, reviews, editorials, and other material from the first six issues of the bimonthly Anthro online furry magazine, September/October 2005 to July/August 2006.

Long, Quentin, ed. ANTHROlogy Two. Anthro Press, November 2009, 638 p.
An anthology of fiction, poetry, essays, reviews, editorials, and other material from issues #7 to #12 of the bimonthly Anthro online furry magazine, September/October 2006 to July/August 2007.

Long, Quentin, ed. ANTHROlogy Three. Anthro Press, November 2010, 724 p.
An anthology of fiction, poetry, essays, reviews, editorials, and other material from issues #13 to #18 of the bimonthly Anthro online furry magazine, September/October 2007 to July/August 2008.

Fred Patten

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Based on the clues in the titles, these are my best guesses for which animals correspond with which stories:

♣ Didus ineptus Linnaeus, by Roz Gibson : Mauritius – dodo (extinct)
♣ A Poor Uncle’s Apprentice, by BanWynn Oakshadow : Romania - lynx
♣ Remembering the Forgotten, by H. J. Pang : Italy – wolf
♣ The Moon Like an Unhatched Egg, by Mary E. Lowd : U.S.A. – bald eagle
♣ Crossroads the Namib, by Jako Malan : Namibia - oryx
♣ Sdani White Wings, by Jennifer Sowle : Denmark – mute swan
♣ The Scent of Lantana, by Frances Pauli : Spain - bull
♣ Huitaca, by Televassi : Chile – Andean condor
♣ To the Kingdom They Come, by H. J. Pang : Malaysia – tiger + Singapore - lion
♣ Bread and Butter, by Allison Thai : Vietnam – water buffalo
♣ The Lion of the Low Countries, by Alice “Huskyteer” Dryden : Belgium – lion

Your rating: None Average: 4 (2 votes)

Congratulations. You got them all correct.

Fred Patten

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I'm surprised no one wrote Scotland and the Unicorn.

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The Scottish Unicorn and the Welsh Dragon are major supporting characters in H. J. Pang's story featuring the Singaporean Lion. (H. J. Pang is really Pang Hee Juon of Singapore. He's also MikasiWolf. He's using MikasiWolf for his stories published by FurPlanet Productions and H. J. Pang for his stories published by Goal Publications. I assume that he will have other pseudonyms for his stories published by other publishers.) No, nobody wrote a story just about the Scottish Unicorn. Somebody tried to write one featuring the German Black Eagle, but he cancelled it just before the deadline because it wasn't coming out right.

Fred Patten

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About the author

Fred (Fred Patten)read storiescontact (login required)

a retired former librarian from North Hollywood, California, interested in general anthropomorphics